Children’s Bathroom Safety

The bathroom is another area of the home that has special safety considerations. It’s a place where making a few changes and taking some precautions can keep your children from harm. First, any medications should be kept in a childproof container, and in the medicine cabinet away from babies’ reach. Once kids get a bit older, they start climbing, and so it’s best to have a lock on the medicine cabinet and keep it locked at all times. If you use a space heater in your bathroom, make sure it’s on a cabinet and that the cord isn’t dangling when you leave. A small child should never be on the floor if there’s a space heater in the room. Another safety hazard that many people don’t consider is the wastebasket. In most bathrooms, the wastebasket is very small, and at a perfect level for a child to play with. If there’s a plastic trash bag in it, a child could easily suffocate by getting it over their head. In addition, make sure if you’ve got small children that you think before you just toss a razor, old medication, or anything unsanitary in the trash. Small children will play with anything, and don’t know the meaning of “trash.” Anything in the wastebasket could easily wind up in their mouth, cutting them or hurting them in some other way. One of the biggest safety hazards for small children in the bathroom is, of course, water. It only takes a small amount of water to drown. No small child should ever be left alone in a bathtub or a sink. The risk is just too great. And don’t forget the toilet. To a small child, it’s just another plaything, and it would be very easy for them to fall in, or to have the seat fall on them. You can purchase locks for your toilets to prevent these accidents. And when bathing a child, always remember to test the water temperature before placing them in the tub or sink. Their skin is very tender, and it doesn’t take much for them to burn. Also, whenever a child is in the bathroom, all electric products such as curling irons should be out of their reach.

Just like in the kitchen, any cleaning products or other hazardous materials should be up high and out of reach, with a lock on the cabinet. Ideally, there should be a lock on the bathroom door that older people can use but children can’t reach, so that they can’t get into the bathroom without you knowing.

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